What a Worker Wants

Why, oh why, is it so difficult for people to strike that perfect work/life balance? We all need flex time every so often because people get sick and car tires go flat. And sometimes, life just gets… weird. Luckily, some employers get this and sadly, some still don’t. But it turns out that employees who work at companies that consider work/life balance tend to be happier and more productive.

In the article, “The Message Is Clear: Workers Still Want Balance, Growth, Advancement,” by Michelle M. Smith reports that workers are walkin’ if they aren’t fulfilled with their jobs. The tlnt.com article reports research that Bersin & Associates’ completed. The research found that personal fulfillment is the key motivator for employees who are looking for a job. Employees aren’t as concerned with financial gain:

“Employees reported a strong work-life balance with opportunities for personal growth and advancement was more important than salary and benefits.”

The firm’s research shows that overall, most employees will stay at a job that’s fulfilling. Also: When a company goes that extra mile to ensure their employees achieve a better balance, workers are happier.

All the above information is great, but if you work for a company that doesn’t consider work/life balance, what can you do? Here are a few ideas, courtesy of WebMD and Time:

Make time for downtime: You schedule time for drinks with friends, right? Well, it’s time to schedule some time for naps, exercise and just being. Taking time to chill and enjoy your life is massively important.

Don’t sweat the silly stuff: Do you find yourself stressing over things that really don’t matter? Ditch those time sucking, worthless habits and pick up new, worthwhile ones! And while you’re making time for good things, perhaps it’s time to start scheduling time for exercise. Moving around and getting some sunshine can do wonders for the brain. Want proof? Read this article about the benefits of walking.
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2014/08/inquiring-minds-barbara-oakley-learning-neuroscience

Ask yourself, “What’s the most important thing I can do right now?:” Listen to that whatever floats into your mind and do what needs to be done. Don’t worry about everything else on your to do list. That stuff can more than likely be done when you have time to think and to breathe.

Image: Pedro Figueiredo